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The best arrondissements in Paris

Updated: Sep 9, 2022


Are you looking for a place to live in Paris? Using this helpful guide, you may learn more about the distinct personalities of the arrondissements in Paris.


If you want to make Paris your home, you have a wide variety of different Parisian areas from which to choose, and the costs of real estate in these communities may vary quite a little depending on the personality of the neighborhood.


Each arrondissement in Paris has its distinct personality, from the famed city center districts that are home to landmarks like the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower to the banlieues and low-cost homes on the outskirts of the city. Reading this guide by Paris Attitude, a real estate agency in Paris that specializes in temporary and long-term furnished rentals, is a good way to get started with your search for a new place to call home because Paris apartments are typically promoted with their arrondissement included in the description.


Paris Attitude


Studio apartments, apartments with two bedrooms, magnificent lofts, and townhouses are just some of the options that Paris Attitude's team of advisers may provide to you when they present you with their vast selection of completely furnished and equipped apartments in Paris.

Investigate the available renting alternatives in Paris.


It is important to note that there are very few homes in Paris, and many buildings do not have elevators. If you would like a little bit more space and a garden, have a look at our guide to the suburbs and towns that are located outside of Paris.


The arrondissements of Paris


In contrast to the layout of many other cities, the arrondissements of Paris are arranged sequentially. The districts spiral outwards from the Louvre, which is located in the first arrondissement (1e). This indicates that the second district is located between the first and third districts and that the ninth district is located between the eighth and tenth districts (and yet the second and ninth districts are next to each other). Although arrondissements may be referenced by their names (for example, Louvre, Popincourt, or Gobelins), the number of an arrondissement is the most usual form of reference, notably in advertising for real estate. Typically, the number will be followed by a little 'e', such as 8e, which is the French equivalent of writing '8th' in English.


The "left bank" (rive gauche) of the Seine is distinguished from the "right bank" (rive droite) in a further classification. This refers to the land to the south (on the left) and the north (on the right) of the Seine River. Because each bank of the river contains about half of the city, the neighborhoods on either side are quite different from one another. In light of the aforementioned, the Rive Gauche is generally considered to be more creative, bohemian, and student-friendly, whilst the Rive Droit is considered to be more bourgeois and polished. Despite this, several sections of the rive droite continue to be working-class neighborhoods that are quite popular among students and families.



Where to live in Paris: Great for nightlife and culture


Premier (1e) arrondissement – Louvre


Deuxième (2e) arrondissement – Bourse


The majority of businesses, offices, and tourist attractions may be found in the center of Paris, whereas there are a very small number of residences. The Bourse building was formerly a stock exchange, and since the surrounding neighborhood is so pedestrian-friendly, staying here is a wonderful option for anybody who wants to be near the central business sector. Because there are so few restaurants and stores in the neighborhood, it tends to empty as the sun goes set.


A quick look at the 1st and 2nd arrondissements:


● Location: the exact geographic center of Paris.

● Housing costs: €1,800 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: Walking is a common choice for those who commute. In addition, a significant number of metro and bus routes pass through this area.

● Cars: parking is quite scarce, it is costly, and there is often heavy congestion.

● Recreation: The Jardin des Tuileries beside the Seine River offers lovely green areas, as well as close access to museums and landmarks. However, restaurants are often swamped with vacationers all day long.

● Shopping: Although day-to-day shopping options are fairly restricted, the Champs Elysées is conveniently located close.

● Neighborhood: largely a commercial area with apartments that are often occupied from Monday through Friday.

● You may learn more by visiting the websites of the 1e or 2e arrondissement municipalities.


Troisième (3e) arrondissement – Temple


Quatrième (4e) arrondissement – Hôtel de Ville


These two neighborhoods comprise what is often known as the Marais neighborhood as a whole. The 4e is an exquisite ancient district on the right bank that contains both the Île de la Cité and the Île Saint-Louis. The Île de la Cité is where Notre Dame Cathedral is located. An address on any island carries with it an incredible air of sophistication. Both the 3e and the 4e are considered to be in a highly central location and both have a vibrant street life as well as lively nightlife.


A quick look at the 3e and 4e arrondissements:


● Location: immediately east of the city center, near the Louvre museum.

● Housing costs: €1,600 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: the 4e is connected to the rest of the city via bus and metro lines. Walking and cycling are also common forms of transportation.

● Cars: due to the high cost of parking, it is not suggested that you own a vehicle of your own.

● Recreation: theatre and museums, with easy access to the rest of the city. There are not many green places, although there are some beautiful hikes along the river. During the summer months, this area is transformed into Paris plage, a sandy beach.

● Shopping: largely expensive boutiques and modest stores.

● Neighborhood: a medieval-era residential area.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the 3e or 4e arrondissement municipality.


Huitième (8e) arrondissement – Élysée


The neighborhood immediately around the Champs-Élysées is dominated by opulent hotels, residences, and the Palace of the President. This exclusive neighborhood is well known among visitors as well as members of the worldwide jet set due to its high prices and sophisticated atmosphere. Bars, shops, restaurants, and nightclubs are open nonstop along the Champs-Élysées, making it seem as if the street is always bustling with activity.


8e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: close to the west of the city center, between the Arc de Triomphe and the Louvre.

● Housing costs: €1,700 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: Walking and riding a bike are both viable methods for commuting. The subway and bus systems are large, however, they may become quite busy at peak tourist times.

● Cars: finding a parking spot may be difficult and costly, and the traffic is notoriously awful, especially in the area near the Arc de Triomphe.

● Recreation: A lively nightlife and busy street scene may be found on the Champs-Élysées, but most of the city's other streets are considerably more peaceful. A delightfully verdant haven may also be found at Parc Monceau.

● Shopping: When it comes to shopping, you'll find a variety of stores, from high-end boutiques to discount stores. However, many of them are geared toward vacationers.

● Neighborhood: The neighborhood consists largely of commercial establishments and administrative buildings, with some residential parts thrown in.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 8e arrondissement.


Neuvième (9e) arrondissement – Opéra


This is mostly a commercial district with very few residential streets, but the 9e neighborhood also includes the exciting and scandalous neighborhood that surrounds the Moulin Rouge. Although it is a busy and sometimes sleazy neighborhood, this location does not have a distinguished address; yet, it does provide convenient access to the city center as well as the Parisian nightlife.


9e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: just to the north of the center of the map.

● Housing costs: €1,600 to 2,300 per month for a two-bedroom apartment. Nevertheless, the costs are quite different depending on whether you want to live close to the posh Opera or in the vicinity of the lively Pigalle neighborhood.

● Commuting options: Walking and cycling are common forms of commuter transportation. The area is traversed by both bus and metro lines as well.

● Cars: There are not many places to park, and bigger stores' deliveries often cause disruptions in the flow of traffic.

● Recreation: Quick access to the center's and Pigalle's nightlife to the north and south. A break from the bustle of the city may be found in one of the many small parks.

● Shopping: Designer brands are available in the nearby Galeries Lafayette. Numerous fashion labels may be found in the nearby streets.

● Neighborhood: The majority of the houses date back to the 19th century or before.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 9e arrondissement.


Where to live in Paris: Great for students and tight budgets


Cinquième (5e) arrondissement – Panthéon


This neighborhood is known as the Quartier Latin, and it is home to several educational institutions, including the prestigious Sorbonne university, which was established in 1257. Because of this, people often refer to it as the student area. It has managed to keep the left bank's lively and bohemian character over the years. You can anticipate a delightfully varied selection of outstanding restaurants, boutiques, and student pubs.


5e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: the southeast corner of the downtown area, next to Notre Dame.

● Housing costs: reasonable, with prices starting at around €1,500 per month for an apartment with two bedrooms.

● Commuting options: Everything you want is within walking distance, and if it is not, there is good service provided by both the bus and the metro.

● Cars: parking might be rather pricey. There is hardly much traffic.

● Recreation: bustling nightlife near a large number of restaurants, markets, and museums. If you have a hankering for some vegetation, the Jardin des Plantes is the place to go.

● Shopping: mostly locally owned and operated mom-and-pop enterprises, along with a few chain stores and marketplaces. Around these parts, you can get your hands on just about anything.

● Neighborhood: a buzzing student neighborhood filled with teens and young people of all ages.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 5e arrondissement.


Dixième (10e) arrondissement – Saint-Laurent


Onzième (11e) arrondissement – Popincourt


These are mostly residential neighborhoods, and both the 10e and the 11e are known for their multiethnic and artistic sensibilities. Be prepared to explore the globe in just a few streets, as you can find anything from Indian eateries near the Gare du Nord to vegan canteens on the banks of the canal Saint-Martin. The area has not been subject to significant gentrification; hence, the cost of rent will vary significantly depending on the neighborhood in which you choose to hunt for an apartment. Because certain localities continue to see foot traffic well into the night, and others have companies that start accepting shipments at ungodly hours of the morning, it is recommended that you go there at various times if at all possible.


10e and 11e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: areas to the north and north-east of the center of the map.

● Housing costs: reasonable, ranging between 1,200 and 1,800 Euros (€) a month for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: Both the Gare du Nord and the Gare de l'Est are located in the 10e district of Paris. This is where many lines of the metro and the bus intersect.

● Cars: minimal parking available. The streets are often congested and might be somewhat small.

● Recreation: The nightlife scene is legendary in the Oberkampf neighborhood. There are a few tiny parks scattered across the neighborhood, but otherwise there is not much vegetation.

● Shopping: a combination of conventional French firms and modern imports from other countries. Both supermarkets and delis may be found in most communities.

● Neighborhood: largely residential, with an eclectic assortment of people from all over the world.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality serving the 10e and 11e arrondissements.


Dix-neuvième (19e) arrondissement – Buttes-Chaumont


Vingtième (20e) arrondissement - Belleville and Ménilmontant


The 19th and 20th arrondissements are home to a mostly working-class population that hails from a variety of nationalities. This is reflected in the activity on the streets, in the stores and restaurants, and in the buzz that can be heard all night long in the bars and nightclubs. It is important to visit the neighborhood after nightfall to gain a comprehensive view of the street since certain sections might be dangerous or loud. In the suburbs, rents are often cheaper, and apartments are typically bigger and more contemporary than they are in the city center.


19e and 20e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: along the city's northern and eastern outskirts.

● Housing costs: reasonable, with a median monthly cost of between €1,000 and €1,600 for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options:The area is traversed by both the metro and bus lines.

● Cars: easy access to the Paris ring road, and contemporary buildings often come equipped with their own parking spaces.

● Recreation: a large number of pubs, dining establishments, and dance clubs. The Pere Lachaise Cemetery is the most notable example of green space in the neighborhood, and its winding paths among the trees are quite lovely.

● Shopping: Small businesses offer a wide variety of things, including a variety of delicacies from across the world.

● Neighborhood: These neighborhoods have a wider variety of architectural styles than the city center. Housing that is available at more affordable prices predominates, along with older structures and newer ones.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the local government serving the 19e and 20e arrondissements.


Where to live in Paris: Great for families


Septième (7e) arrondissement – Tour Eiffel


The Eiffel Tower is the most recognizable landmark in this area, and apartments that provide a view of it tend to be among the more costly options. Children will enjoy playing in the parks at Invalides and at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, both of which are located in Paris. Both the American University in Paris and the Bilingual Montessori School of Paris may be found in the 7e arrondissement.


7e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: south-west of the city's core, in the vicinity of the Eiffel Tower.

● Housing costs: pricey, with rent for a two-bedroom apartment starting at €1,800 per month.

● Commuting options: Both the metro and the bus pass through this area. Cycling and walking are popular.

● Cars: Parking is scarce and might be challenging to find. Tour buses and coaches are frequently the culprits behind traffic congestion.

● Recreation: The Musée d'Orsay is one of the most well-known museums in the world. Aside from that, it is rather calm, and it is very convenient to go to parks, the Seine, and the rest of the city.

● Shopping: normally unimportant and self-sufficient. You may expect to make a stop at the baker, the cheese store, and the greengrocer.

● Neighborhood: mostly comprised of typical residential ones, and it has a considerable number of charming historic structures.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 7e arrondissement.


Seizième (16e) arrondissement – Passy


This region is well known among expats and is home to a flourishing American population. It is the location of the International School of Paris, which provides an educational program in the English language, as well as the Eurecole, which offers immersion programs in the French language as well as preparation for various European tests (including British, German, and Spanish). The area is known for its tranquility, prosperity, and laid-back attitude.


16e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: located on the western outskirts of the city, beginning with the Arc de Triomphe and continuing to the Bois de Boulogne.

● Housing costs: reasonable, ranging between 1,400 and 2,000 Euros (€) a month for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: There are bus and subway lines that go through the neighborhood. Cycling is another option open to you.

● Cars: The cost of parking is often high, and the area surrounding the Arc de Triomphe is notorious for its gridlock and congestion.

● Recreation: The streets are lined with quaint eateries and coffee shops. The expansive Bois de Boulogne park may be found just next door to this neighborhood.

● Shopping: luxury boutiques are located close to the Seine, while more affordable options may be found farther away. There are often foreign sections at supermarkets.

● Neighborhood: a variety of residential options, ranging from modern apartment towers with views of the Seine to townhomes built in the 17th century.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 16th arrondissement.


Dix-septième (17e) arrondissement – Batignolles-Monceau


The 17th arrondissement is a diverse area that offers a range of housing options, from highly costly flats to very modest ones. Apartments are often more spacious than those found in the city center, and they cater to families. In addition, it is the location of the International Honoré de Balzac Collège. There are no tuition costs associated with attending this state-run institution, which also provides instruction in a variety of foreign languages. The majority of the students on the international track spend between six and eight hours a week working in their native tongue, while the remaining time is spent studying French.


17e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: at the far north-western part of the city.

● Housing costs: reasonable, with average monthly costs for a two-bedroom apartment ranging between 1,600 and 2,000 Euros.

● Commuting options: The neighborhood is serviced by many modes of public transportation, including the metro, bus, and RER lines. Cycling is another popular activity.

● Cars: Parking spots are restricted but not impossible to find. Simple access to the ring road around Paris.

● Recreation: There are a large number of restaurants, theatres, and small parks.

● Shopping: a variety of food stores, including supermarkets as well as French and foreign boutiques. Mostly independent boutiques, with a few chain businesses mixed.

● Neighborhood: a neighborhood that is mostly residential but also has some offices and major companies.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 17th arrondissement.



Where to live in Paris: Great for peace


Sixième (6e) arrondissement – Luxembourg


This neighborhood is sometimes referred to as the Saint-Germain Faubourg or Saint-Germain-des-Prés and is considered to be the epicenter of the left bank. As the 20th century came to a close, the 6e neighborhood in Paris underwent gentrification and has since become one of the city's most costly residential areas. It was formerly known for its anarchic and creative culture, but now it has been transformed into a lovely and peaceful neighborhood that is located relatively near to the city's central business district.


6e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: positioned due south-west of the center of the map.

● Housing costs: pricey, with a median monthly cost of between €1,800 and €2,600 for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: strong links through the metro and the bus system. Walking and riding bicycles are also viable options.

● Cars: parking spaces are few and pricey.

● Recreation: The expansive Jardin du Luxembourg is a lovely park that is perfect for jogging, cycling, or just taking a stroll.

● Shopping: designer shops and small food outlets prevail.

● Neighborhood: a large number of historically significant structures that have been renovated into flats.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 6e arrondissement.


Quatorzième (14e) arrondissement – Observatoire


Quinzième (15e) arrondissement – Vaugirard


These two residential areas are split by the Gare Montparnasse in the center of the city. It is the terminal for trains coming from Brittany, and the neighborhood is still home to a significant number of eateries serving Breton cuisine. Keep an eye out for the delicious crêpes that are served with a cup of cider. They are sure to satisfy. Aside from that, the atmosphere in both arrondissements is often calm and almost suburban. They tend to be busier in areas that are closer to the heart of Paris, such as the area surrounding the station and specific retail avenues.


A quick look at the 14th and 15th arrondissements:


● Location: on the outskirts of the city, to the south and south-west of the central business district.

● Housing costs: reasonable, ranging between 1,400 and 1,900 Euros (€) a month for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: multiple stations for buses and metro trains. Simple access to the ring road around Paris.

● Cars: Only a small number of buildings have designated parking spaces. There is often the option of paying for parking.

● Recreation: some theatres, pubs, and eateries. There are several attractive little parks, the largest of which is Parc Montsouris.

● Shopping: a variety of supermarkets, national retailers, and tiny local businesses may be found strewn over the neighborhood. Regular markets.

● Neighborhood: largely residential. A combination of modern high-rises and older, more conventional structures.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the 14e and 15e arrondissement municipalities.


Dix-huitième (18e) arrondissement – Buttes-Montmartre


The area immediately around Sacré Coeur is characterized by its winding, village-like streets. A tranquil community of working-class residents is formed as the region pours down the back of the hill, away from the central business district of Paris. A bustling tourist zone may be found at the southernmost point, on the boundary with the 9e. Because this southern end has some rougher areas, it is important to have a solid understanding of the surrounding community before choosing a new residence here.


18e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: near the outskirts of the city to the north.

● Housing costs: inexpensive, with a median monthly cost of between €1,200 and €1,600 for a two-bedroom apartment.

● Commuting options: The area is served by several bus and metro lines. Simple access to the ring road around Paris.

● Cars: There is some parking on the street, but very few residences have a garage or driveway.

● Recreation: The southern half of Pigalle is where most of the action takes place, while the northern section is characterized by its relative tranquility, with movies, restaurants, and a few attractive parks.

● Shopping: a variety of conventional markets, in addition to supermarkets and other retail establishments.

● Neighborhood: a calm and almost suburban atmosphere may be found towards the north. The south is both bustling and urban.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 18th arrondissement.



Where to live in Paris: Great for being active


Douzième (12e) arrondissement – Reuilly / Daumesnil


In addition to being a prominent hub for viewing live sports, the Palais Omnisports has a skate park and places designated for jogging in the park that surrounds it. Rowing is one of the activities that may be done on the Seine, while runners, walkers, and cyclists frequent the Bois de Vincennes and the elevated park that is known as the Coulée Verte in Paris.


12e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: near the edge of the town toward the south-east.

● Housing costs: reasonable, with average monthly costs ranging from 1,500 to 2,000 Euros for a two-bedroom flat.

● Commuting options: Both the metro and the bus system provide connections to the central business district. Cycling is popular.

● Cars: Parking is often in short supply. Simple access to the roadways that surround Paris.

● Recreation: There are a lot of parks and sports facilities, but there isn't much nightlife.

● Shopping: There are grocery stores and other types of businesses on almost every street.

● Neighborhood: a family-oriented neighborhood with a large number of homes.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 12th arrondissement.


Treizième (13e) arrondissement - Gobelins / Porte d'Italie


From the floating swimming pool in the Seine to Chinatown, the 13th arrondissement is a wonderful area to explore the Parisian way of life, and the tree-lined streets make for a pleasant cycling ride. The majority of the buildings in the region are homes, although there are also some significant office complexes.


13e arrondissement at a glance:


● Location: a portion of the city's south-east border.

● Housing costs: inexpensive, with average monthly costs for a two-bedroom apartment ranging between 1,200 and 1,700 Euros.

● Commuting options: cycling is popular. There are bus routes and metro lines that go through the neighborhood.

● Cars: a quick and simple connection to the Paris ring road. It is tough to get parking just about everywhere in Paris.

● Recreation: There are a variety of sports clubs available, ranging from yoga to tennis.

● Shopping: a limited number of shopping malls and major supermarkets in addition to a huge number of small, independently owned stores.

● Neighborhood: Several contemporary high-rise apartment buildings are encircled by townhouses built in the 19th century.

● You may learn more by visiting the website of the municipality that serves the 13th arrondissement.



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